Common Mental Disorders & Misused Substances

National Recovery Month. Prevention Works, Treatment is Effective, People Recover. September 2018.

Content Provided By: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration | September 4, 2018

Every September, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) (https://www.samhsa.gov/), within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) (https://www.hhs.gov/), sponsors National Recovery Month (Recovery Month) to increase awareness of behavioral health conditions. This observance promotes the knowledge that behavioral health is essential to overall health, prevention works, treatment is effective, and people can and do recover from mental and substance use disorders.

The 2018 Recovery Month theme, “Join the Voices for Recovery: Invest in Health, Home, Purpose, and Community,” explores how integrated care, a strong community, sense of purpose, and leadership contribute to effective treatments that sustain the recovery of persons with mental and substance use disorders.

Behavioral Health Prevalence in the United States

Millions of people in the U.S. live with a mental or substance use disorder. The prevalence of these conditions highlights the importance of focusing funding and attention on behavioral health needs.

    • In 2016, there were 20.1 million people (7.5 percent), aged 12 or older who had a substance use disorder in the past year. ¹
    • The rate of drug overdose deaths involving heroin increased on average by 19% from 2014 to 2016.²
    • An estimated 7.3 million of underage persons aged 12 to 20 (19.3 percent) were current drinkers in 2016, including 4.5 million who reported binge alcohol use (12.1 percent) and 1.1 million heavy drinkers (2.8 percent). ³
    • Data from 2016 demonstrated that among adults aged 18 or older, 44.7 million adults (18.3 percent) had any mental illness in the past year.⁴ A person with any mental illness (AMI) is defined as an individual having any mental, behavioral, or emotional disorder in the past year that met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) criteria (excluding developmental and substance use disorders).⁵
    • Among adults aged 18 or older, 10.4 million adults (4.2 percent) had a serious mental illness (SMI) in the past year. ⁶ A person with a serious mental illness is defined as an individual having any mental, behavioral, or emotional disorder resulting in serious functional impairment, which substantially interfered with or limited one or more major life activities. AMI and SMI are not mutually exclusive categories; adults with SMI are included in estimates of adults with AMI
    • In 2016, an estimated 8.2 million U.S. adults 18 or older reported having co-occurring disorders. This means that within the previous year, they experienced both a mental illness and a substance use disorder. ⁷
    • About 6.1 percent of individuals aged 18 to 25 (2.1 million) had co-occurring mental illness and a substance use disorder. ⁸
    • In 2016, approximately 44,965 Americans died as a result of suicide–on average, more than 123 deaths per day. ⁹
    • Suicide was the second leading cause of death in 2015 for two age groups: individuals aged 15 to 24 and 25 to 34. ¹⁰

To learn more about the most common mental and substance use disorders and how SAMHSA works to reduce their impact on America’s communities, please visit: https://www.samhsa.gov/disorders

¹ Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality. (2017). Key substance use and mental health indicators in the United States: Results from the 2016 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, NSDUH Series H-52, HHS Publication No. (SMA) 17-5044. Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Web. 1 November 2017. Retrieved from https:// www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/NSDUHFFR1-2016/NSDUH-FFR1-2016.pdf

² Hedegaard H, Warner M, Miniño AM. Drug overdose deaths in the United States, 1999–2016. NCHS Data Brief, no 294. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2017.

³ Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality. (2017). Results from the 2016 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Detailed Tables: Table 2.52A and 2.52B. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Rockville, MD. Web. 4 October 2017. Retrieved from https:// www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/NSDUHDetTabs-2016/NSDUH-DetTabs-2016.htm#tab252A

⁴ Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality. (2017). Key substance use and mental health indicators in the United States: Results from the 2016 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, NSDUH Series H-52, HHS Publication No. (SMA) 17-5044. Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Web. 1 November 2017. Retrieved from https:// www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/NSDUHFFR1-2016/NSDUH-FFR1-2016.pdf

⁵ American Psychiatric Association. (1994). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) (4th ed.). Washington, DC.

⁶ Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality. (2017). Key substance use and mental health indicators in the United States: Results from the 2016 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, NSDUH Series H-52, HHS Publication No. (SMA) 17-5044. Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Web. 1 November 2017. Retrieved from https:// www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/NSDUHFFR1-2016/NSDUH-FFR1-2016.pdf

⁷ Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality. (2017). Key substance use and mental

health indicators in the United States: Results from the 2016 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, NSDUH Series H-52, HHS Publication No. (SMA) 17-5044. Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Web. 1 November 2017. Retrieved from https:// www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/NSDUHFFR1-2016/NSDUH-FFR1-2016.pdf

⁸ Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality. (2017). Key substance use and mental health indicators in the United States: Results from the 2016 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, NSDUH Series H-52, HHS Publication No. (SMA) 17-5044. Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Web. 1 November 2017. Retrieved from https:// www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/NSDUHFFR1-2016/NSDUH-FFR1-2016.pdf

⁹ Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. (2016). Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS). Web. 4 October 2017. Retrieved from https://webappa.cdc.gov/ sasweb/ncipc/mortrate.html

¹⁰ Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. (2015). Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS). Web. 16 April 2018. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/ data/nvsr/nvsr66/nvsr66_05.pdf

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2018-09-06T23:07:11+00:00